The Importance of Sleep

The Importance of Sleep

The importance of Sleep is certainly not a new concept. The more you read, the more you will find bloggers, authors and health experts talking about the importance of good sleep. Why is that, and how long should we be sleeping for?
I have heard through the years in my clinical setting and also from family and friends, people say, that they don’t need much sleep, or can survive on less than 8 hours and feel fine the next day. But have then gone on to observe, shorter attention spans, impatience, poor digestion and so forth. With restorative sleep, we have improved mood, enhanced physical and emotional resilience, better hormonal function and increased physical endurance.
The more you look into the sleep-patterns and habits the more you will come to realise the importance of good restorative sleep..
Below are some of the essentials when it comes to Sleep routines and habits — The best time to be in bed is by 10pm. Getting two hours of sleep before 12pm is vital.
– As adults we need a minimum of 8 hours sleep per night.
– Avoid any form of technology in your bedroom. The light emitted from these devices can interfere you getting a restorative sleep.
– Try to avoid being using technology at least 30 minutes prior to bedtime.
– Have a relaxing bath or a cup of herbal tea (chamomile) if you find it difficult to get to sleep.
– Magnesium supplements can be very helpful if you find it difficult to get to sleep and/or stay asleep during the night.Habits take time to create. I have certainly found with building a business and brand that I have had periods where I have slept very little and as a result have neglected my health and wellbeing. One of our big focuses this year, not just personally but as a family is to aim for at least 5 nights a week to be in bed by 10pm. It is a challenge, but it is one of the biggest things you can do to improve your health and wellbeing, and also your productivity the next day.For further reading I would highly recommend the books by Dr Libby Weaver, particularly her book Beauty From The Inside Out.

With restorative sleep, we have improved mood, enhanced physical and emotional resilience, better hormonal function and increased physical endurance. 

Below are some of the essentials when it comes to Sleep routines and habits — The best time to be in bed is by 10pm. Getting two hours of sleep before 12pm is vital.
– As adults we need a minimum of 8 hours sleep per night.
– Avoid any form of technology in your bedroom. The light emitted from these devices can interfere you getting a restorative sleep.
– Try to avoid being using technology at least 30 minutes prior to bedtime.
– Have a relaxing bath or a cup of herbal tea (chamomile) if you find it difficult to get to sleep.
– Magnesium supplements can be very helpful if you find it difficult to get to sleep and/or stay asleep during the night.Habits take time to create. I have certainly found with building a business and brand that I have had periods where I have slept very little and as a result have neglected my health and wellbeing. One of our big focuses this year, not just personally but as a family is to aim for at least 5 nights a week to be in bed by 10pm. It is a challenge, but it is one of the biggest things you can do to improve your health and wellbeing, and also your productivity the next day.For further reading I would highly recommend the books by Dr Libby Weaver, particularly her book Beauty From The Inside Out.

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The Importance of Deep Breathing

The Importance of Deep Breathing

The Importance of Deep Breathing

This may be a different title than you were expecting as we continue to look at the Theme Restore. However, it has become well known that Diaphragmatic Breathing is so incredibly beneficial for your health and wellbeing. It can even add in weight loss if your body is used to living in the ‘red zone’ or ‘adrenaline zone’

Diaphragmatic Breathing is essential for restoring your  health and wellbeing. This is an exercise we should all be doing. It does not involve anything more than taking a couple of minutes to focus on our breathing technique.

Why is it so important?
In today’s world we are always busy and even when we are not we still say we are, and so as a result we often live in a state of anxiety and rushing from one thing to the next. The impact of this is we often live in our ‘flight or fight’ mode. This part of our nervous system is activated and has a direct impact on our bodies balance of hormones and numerous other implications, including weight gain, poor digestion and poor sleep. This is where diaphragmatic breathing comes in. The impact of this on the nervous system is crucial. Nothing communicates better to each cell of your body that you are safe, than your breathing.

So how do you diaphragmatically breathe?
Make sure your tummy moves in and out as you breathe, not just your upper chest. Place your hand over your stomach and let it expand as you breath in followed by your chest, pause and then slowly exhale, first emptying your lungs followed by your abdomen. Aim to consciously breathe like this for a few breaths  a couple of times a day. Schedule it into your diary to remind yourself.

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